*** About Dorothy Thorpe***
About Dorothy Thorpe
Thorpe Fakes & Forgeries
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FAKES, FORGERIES AND COMMON MISTAKES

When we think of art, in any form, we know there are copies. Great masters' works are generally copied as a print, lithograph, giclee, etc. It's not as easy to copy divinely etched glass and for that reason, nobody really has. But that's not for lack of trying.

As previously mentioned, people will go to great lengths to call something a Thorpe when it could never be a Thorpe "Original". Below are a few examples of some of the fakes and forgeries held out to be Thorpe.


Starting with Thorpe's mark, it should be a sandblasted DTC stylezed so the C and D are almost the same. Here is a fake sigtnature and a real mark, you can tell the difference.



This is a pretty recent label. It appears on glass that is heavily decorated with various pictures (see image to left of label). It's not a Thorpe piece in the sense that Thorpe herself had anything to do with it, though it could have been done by a comopany that purchased the company at some point in time.


This label is done in silver (metallic) writing and border on white background. It is used for Thorpe "Allegro" or some people refer to it as "Silver Band". It was not used on Thorpe "Old Gold" which has a platinum border vs silver. Silver tarnishes, platinum does not. If your piece(s) don't taranish and remain highly reflective, then you have"Old Gold". The distinction is important.




I found this bowl at a department store; it sure looked familiar. But clearly, it's not Thorpe's Eucalyptus. I've added a photo of Thorpe's Eucalyptus for comparison.



This is not made by Dorothy Thorpe. Somebody on eBay found some pieces of Mercury glass (Queen's Lusterware) somewhere and coined the name "Silver Fade". I can't count how many times I've seen this glass in thrift stores. Some sellers use both terms: "Dorothy Thorpe and "Silver Fade" in their sale listings. It known as Queen's Lusterware which is Mercury Glass. For more information about this NOT a DOROTHY C. THORPE product, go to Queen's Lusterware Information or search "Mercury Glass".



These images show the care card that came with Old Gold glassware. The font is not typical Thorpe but then again, it's made by a company post-Thorpe (1955). For what it's worth, Queens Lusterware was not featured on "Mad Men". That was Allegro (Silver Band). Mad Men was set in the '60s. This was made post 1955. There seems to be no shortage of people who would like to sell you some Mercury Glass as "Silver Fade" by Thorpe.


It's soooo close. But close doesn't count 'cept in horseshoes and hand grenades ;) This decoration is so similar to Thorpe's etched Cattleya Orchid both etched and stencilled, but it's not Thorpe. I'm going to post the etched Thorpe piece so you can see the differences.


COMMONLY MISTAKEN AS THORPE

At around the same time, almost all of the big department stores thought sand-blasted glass was all the rage and hired many glass artists to etch decorative glass for them. Duncan Miller is responsible for "Magnolia" (shown). If not researched, you will likely find it listed as a Dorothy Thorpe original.

Another less common mistake is Duncan Miller's "Clematis".


Fostoria also did a line of sand-etched stemware in "Orchid". I have a set of eight of them and they will probably be listed for sale soon as it occurs to me that I really don't entertain much and when I do, I pull out the cut crystal instead. I will see about posting a picture if I can't find one already taken.